Racial Equity and Inclusion

Roseville Staff Provides Equity Report

Review the most recent Equity Update (September 2022).


2022 All-Department Equity update 

Equity Update presentation (May 23, 2022)

/DocumentCenter/View/33933/2022-September-Equity-Update

The City of Roseville is dedicated to creating an inclusive community where the predictability of success is not based on race or ethnicity.

The actions of government at the federal, state, and local level have created racial disparities that continue to harm our community. Rectifying these disparities is critical to the development of a vibrant community and a high quality of life for all residents.

All City Departments will prioritize racial equity in their planning, delivery, and evaluation of programs, policies, and services.

City of Roseville


Inclusion and Respect Statement

The City of Roseville strives to be a welcoming and inclusive place for all. We are committed to promoting respectful conduct, equitable service, and diversity in our community. We condemn discrimination by or against residents, visitors, workers, city employees or city businesses. In all that we do as a City government, we pledge to treat everyone fairly, respectfully, and without bias, regardless of their color, creed, religion, national origin, gender, marital status, familial status, immigration status, sexual orientation, age, income, or disability.



Why We Lead with Race

A year into the first iteration of the Strategic Racial Equity Action Plan (SREAP), the City is making steady progress with it's top three priorities to help improve racial equity in the City of Roseville: diversify its workforce, diversify its boards and commissions, and implement a racial equity toolkit.  

The City’s approach to the SREAP and plan to address systemic equity begins with the foundational concept that the entire community’s success is dependent on every individual’s ability to succeed. Data has consistently shown that the most persistent and detrimental disparities in regard to education, housing, workforce, public safety, healthcare, and entrepreneurship are largest when looking at race.  

The City recognizes that racial inequities, across all indicators for success, are deep and pervasive. The City also realizes that there are many other groups of people who are still marginalized. “Everyone in the community has a cross section of identities often defined by age, gender identity, race, culture, sexual orientation, disability, and economic status, to name a few,” says Equity and Inclusion Manager, Thomas Brooks. “Each of these identities, particularly those not in traditionally dominant groups, have experienced a number of systemic barriers and inequities that play a role in their ability to thrive in our communities today.”   

By focusing on racial equity, the City is able to use the framework, tools, and resources it develops and apply it to other marginalized areas.  

While it may seem that laws can be changed quickly, it can take generations to undue harm caused to families and communities by exclusive and discriminatory processes and policies. The SREAP and the Racial Equity Toolkit were created to put race in the forefront of the decisions made at the City level. An example of this can be seen in the rate of homeownership. “Redlining,” the discriminatory practice of denying mortgages to residents of certain areas based on their race or ethnicity, first happened in the early 20th century. Yet the repercussions of this practice are still felt today. 

“According to the 2016-20 American Community Survey, in Roseville, the homeownership rate of both Black and Hispanic populations are about 27.5%. Homeownership of white households is 73.3%. Conversely, renter statistics show the opposite trend,” says Brooks. 

The City of Roseville is working on several programs and projects that support its equity and inclusion goals. For more information about the SREAP, contact Equity and Inclusion Manager, Thomas Brooks at 651-792-7029 or thomas.brooks@cityofroseville.com